Woman looking at mobile phone with caregiver.

Preserving Their Dignity: Utilizing Technology in Caregiving (Part 4 of 4)

At The Reutlinger Community, we strive to educate residents, future residents and adult children about all aspects of the dementia process and best practices for ensuring the best quality of life for your loved one – and yourself. In this four-part series, we discuss the importance of providing dignity throughout the dementia journey and how you can connect compassionately and in fulfilling ways.

We don’t always think of the words “seniors” and “technology” in the same sentence. But perhaps we all need to rethink that. As technology becomes more and more commonplace and integrated into our lives, it really shouldn’t be a surprise that it’s moving from “the cool new thing” to “a capability that can help everyone improve quality of life.” Think of the Apple Watch® with its fitness-tracking abilities, or apps that allow diabetics to read their blood sugar with the press of a button – and adjust insulin accordingly. Sure, being “plugged in” all the time can have its disadvantages. But it can also, surprisingly, provide safety and dignity, especially when it comes to caregivers and their senior loved ones.

“Obviously, the first thing that many caregivers use technology for is research and gathering information about how to help their loved one, but these days, that’s just scratching the surface,” says Andrea Campisi, Marketing and Admissions Director of The Reutlinger Community, a Continuing Care Retirement Community in Danville, CA. “There are literally hundreds of applications and products available that can be used to help improve the caregiving experience and provide senior loved ones with a better quality of life.”

In fact, says Andrea, technology has the benefit of allowing seniors to be more independent and self-reliant than ever before. Technology can give seniors access to the world without them ever having to leave the house. “Apps like Facebook or Skype allow seniors to stay in touch with loved ones and interact with friends face-to-face without them having to be in the same room or time zone,” she says. “Other technologies can keep seniors safe, provide physical activity and encourage lifelong learning, just to name a few.”

The Benefits of Digital Technology for Caregivers

Caregiving for a loved one is a full-time job that often has to be juggled with other full-time jobs like careers, raising kids and everything else that comes with a full, separate life. That doesn’t leave a lot of spare time – but that’s just one of the ways that technology can help caregivers.

These days, technology allows you to outsource everything from the obvious (like housekeeping and yardwork) to the surprising (grocery shopping, transportation and even time management). Grocery delivery services are becoming more ubiquitous at local stores, and services like TaskRabbit make it easy to hire helpers for anything from house cleaning to assembling furniture to even being a part-time assistant. Services like Uber and Lift can help time-strapped caregivers coordinate transportation for senior loved ones who need to go to and from appointments or events.

There are plenty of senior- and caregiving-specific technologies that have been created to help caregivers and their loved ones live more freely, as well. Assistive technology devices (ATDs) like stairlifts, hearing aids, power scooters and wheelchairs, magnifying devices for computers and voice-controlled clocks with medication reminders are all things that can be used to streamline caregiving and take some of the heavy lifting off your shoulders (literally and figuratively).

The Benefits of Digital Technology for Seniors

Digital technology provides a variety of benefits for seniors, and that goes double for individuals with dementia. For example, wearable tech like tracking watches can help caregivers keep track of what’s going on with their loved ones even if they’re out running errands. Medical alert systems like bracelets or necklaces can allow seniors to call for assistance instantly. Here are some other ways that digital technology can assist with providing a better quality of life for your loved one with dementia:

  • Staying fit. Technology makes it easy to exercise mind, body and soul without ever having to leave the house. Video game systems like the Nintendo Wii allow for light-impact versions of favorite exercise like bowling, tennis and others (as well as more traditional aerobics and cardio). Amazon Prime, Netflix, Hulu and YouTube offer video series of practically any exercise you can imagine, plus meditation, calming exercises and therapy videos. And, of course, games like Words with Friends and other fun activities can help keep cognitive functions as sharp as possible while providing a bit of social interaction, too.
  • Promoting independence and dignity. Being able to accomplish tasks and use their existing abilities will boost your loved one’s self-esteem, can assist with slowing down cognitive decline, and also can help you relax a little, too. Simple things like smart pill boxes that alert seniors when it’s time to take medicine can allow your loved one to take his or her own pills without you having to manage it. Links to favorite apps or an easy way to access preferred entertainment can help seniors manage their time and do the things they enjoy, all on their own.
  • Providing security and helping reduce unwanted behaviors. Some technologies are specifically designed to help ease behaviors like anxiety, agitation and confusion. For example, clocks that have been designed to be easy to read will help someone who is confused easily and is worried about what day or time it is. Special power strips will monitor electrical appliances and can send alerts to caregivers if the stove, curling iron or other item has not been turned off. There are also personal assistance devices that can play reminders and messages to help manage and soothe your loved one with dementia, such as reminders to lock the door when they leave, or to provide reassurance when you aren’t available.
  • Helping communication. The Alzheimer’s Society reports that technologies like iPads and other interactive devices can help seniors with dementia to better express themselves through creativity and provide ways to communicate with their surroundings.
  • Memory-boosting. Exercising the mind can help stave off further cognitive decline and allow sharpening of abilities that remain. There are many games available now that have been specifically designed to help individuals with dementia. A surprising memory-booster that technology can help with is through music. It’s been proven time and time again that music can allow seniors to unlock memories of their past and can actually help improve communication. Satellite or internet radio can provide a ready-to-go playlist of favorites for your loved one to enjoy again and again.

For more information about using technology in the caregiving space, or to learn more about our community, our culture and our mission and values, please contact us at 925-272-0261

Premier Senior Living, Dedicated Care

Offering Assisted LivingEnhanced Assisted LivingMemory CareSkilled Nursing and Rehabilitation, The Reutlinger Community provides a continuum of care that allows seniors to live a life-enhancing and stimulating environment. Located in Danville, California, The Reutlinger Community’s newly renovated, 110,000 square foot community combines the comfort and familiarity of home with seasoned senior care and skilled nursing specialists to suit any seniors needs, allowing them to live the life they choose with freedom and security.

Because we specialize in a continuum of care, our residents never need to worry about leaving the community they call home or wonder what will happen when they need some more care. Residents and families alike can have peace of mind knowing that there are full-time licensed nurses available, along with activity coordinators, social workers, caregivers, a concierge and Rabbi who focus solely on helping each resident thrive. Even better, our services and amenities are equal to those of a state-of-the-art resort. This is the lifestyle and care that your loved one deserves.

At The Reutlinger, seniors have numerous opportunities to engage in award-winning programs that are designed to engage the mind, renew the spirit and provide opportunities to meet new people and learn something new. Whether residents are enjoying our art program and museum, listening to a lecture or educational program or attending spiritual programming and our wide range of activities, there’s something for each resident to love. Participate as much or as little as you like, the choice is all yours.

For more information or to schedule a personal tour, contact us today.

The Reutlinger Community and Eskaton Affiliation

Frequently Asked Questions

Q. Will the Reutlinger Community maintain its Jewish values?
A. The affiliation agreement unequivocally protects TRC’s religious and cultural Jewish values moving forward. The Reutlinger Community will continue to rely on the generosity and participation of the broader East Bay Jewish community for support, as it has over the past 70 years.

Q. What will happen to the assets owned by the community?
A. Reutlinger assets will be managed by Eskaton but use of the assets will exclusively benefit residents of the Reutlinger community. All restricted gifts donated in the past, present or future to Reutlinger will accrue for the benefit of the community.

Q. Will the Reutlinger board remain as-is?
A. Eskaton will be named the sole member of the Reutlinger Board. In turn, the outgoing Reutlinger board will appoint a representative to the Eskaton board from the East Bay Jewish community to ensure Eskaton retains and upholds the Jewish values and heritage outlined in the affiliation agreement. In the future, a local Jewish organization – synagogue, JFCS, Federation, etc. – will be named as Designator Organization to select future community representatives for the Eskaton board.

That organization will nominate all future board appointees and, in the extreme result of any dissolution by Eskaton, will either be the recipient of any assets still “held” by the Reutlinger or will distribute such funds for the well-being of the East Bay Jewish community.

The Eskaton board currently has 12 members and will expand to 13 once the Reutlinger member is appointed. The Reutlinger Community will retain its name and corporate status as a 501©3 not-for-profit organization.

Q. How will the Designator Organization be selected?
A. The current Reutlinger Board will select the Designator Organization. The Reutlinger Board has nominated six potential Jewish organizations, vetted each, and has selected one, pending final board approval by that organization.

Q. How long a term will the Eskaton board representative for Reutlinger serve before they step down?
A. The representative will serve a maximum of nine years broken into three (3), three-year terms barring resignation, loss of life, etc.

Q. To whom will the Eskaton board representative for Reutlinger report to or share any relevant information from the Eskaton board meeting?
A. Relevant information from board meetings will be reported to the Designator Organization.

Q. Will TRC trustees receive minutes from the Eskaton board meetings?
A. Meeting minutes and summaries from the Eskaton Board of Directors are available by contacting Eskaton at 916.334.0810 or via email at Todd.Murch@eskaton.org.

Q. Will leadership at TRC change as the community transitions from a stand-alone to an affiliate of Eskaton?
A. Jay Zimmer will remain as president and CEO through transition until June 2020 when Eskaton appoints an Executive Director. Zimmer will play an active role in recruitment efforts for the successor.

Q. Will there be any other staff changes in the current management?
A. Eskaton will not rush-in to make any sweeping changes to personnel. It is important for Eskaton during the early stages of any affiliation to learn about community management standards and employee skillsets. Eskaton has very high employee satisfaction. In the past two years, Eskaton was named a “Best Place to Work” by the Sacramento Business Journal and received a national certification from the Great Place to Work institute based on staff survey results that endorsed a high-trust environment featuring empowered and engaged employees.

Q. Who will manage the financial investments for TRC?
A. Eskaton uses the “Carver Model” for governance, meaning there will be no committee designated to manage community investments. Eskaton investments are managed through Wells Fargo similarly to current Reutlinger investment policies.

Q. Is there a way to break the contract if necessary?
A. The Reutlinger Community representative on the Eskaton Board of Directors would have to allege Eskaton breached the affiliation agreement, which includes outlined procedures to either reconcile or proceed toward disaffiliation.

Q. How long is the initial contract period before it is up for renewal?
A. Barring any breach in contract, the affiliation will be permanent.

Q. Will there be costs to TRC if we decide to sever our relationship with Eskaton? If so, what is amount?
A. This item has not yet been determined and the amount will be subject to final negotiation.

Q. Why are Eskaton and TRC affiliating?
A. Senior living communities are facing tougher competition, increased regulations, decreased reimbursement and limited access to capital in the ever-changing senior living environment; several services considered “must-haves” in today’s environment such as home-care and licensed home health care are beyond the community’s ability to develop and manage.  Eskaton, with its broad portfolio of senior housing options, can provide TRC with the scale that hospital systems and third-party payers require of their partners. Strategically speaking, TRC has certain needs and Eskaton can provide the services and programs that will be necessary for sustained success.

 

Please forward any additional questions to:
Jay Zimmer, President and CEO
The Reutlinger Community
jzimmer@rcjl.org
925-964-2063

woman comforting a loved one

Preserving Their Dignity: Tips for Difficult Conversations (Part 3 of 4)

At The Reutlinger Community, we strive to educate residents, future residents and adult children about all aspects of the dementia process and best practices for ensuring the best quality of life for your loved one – and yourself. In this four-part series, we discuss the importance of providing dignity throughout the dementia journey and how you can connect compassionately and in fulfilling ways.

When your loved one has dementia, it may seem like every conversation ends up being a difficult one. What type of care should Mom or Dad receive? What will happen when he or she requires more help? How should end-of-life treatment be handled?

“Hard conversations will happen throughout all phases of the dementia journey – it’s just a matter of fact considering the course of the disease,” says Andrea Campisi, Marketing and Admissions Director of The Reutlinger Community, a Continuing Care Retirement Community in Danville, CA. Hopefully, you and your loved one (as well as other interested parties) will have important conversations as soon as the disease is diagnosed, but as with any plan, you’ll need to revisit it on a regular basis.

“Eventually, you or your loved one’s designated representative will need to be the decision-maker for care plans and other mid- to late-stage dementia decisions,” says Andrea. “This is easier for everyone involved if your loved one’s wishes are clear and everyone is on the same page regarding next steps. However, even if your loved one is in the more advanced stages of dementia, there are still ways to help preserve their dignity, respect them as a person and take their needs into consideration.”

Having Difficult Conversations Early Stages

There are many tough decisions that have to be made at the beginning of the dementia journey. It’s easy for family members to leap into action and want to make decisions for their loved one. Although this comes from a place of love, remember that your loved one is the person who should ultimately make as many of the hard decisions as possible.

“Too many people hear the word dementia and assume that their loved one can no longer function,” says Andrea. “But most of the time, the person with dementia is still highly functioning and can think clearly, rationally and make their own decisions. If the disease is still in the early stages, you, your loved one and other interested parties should work together to plan for the future.”

Things like treatment and care, living situations and determining powers of attorney should be decided at this time. Ask your loved one to clearly state their wishes for what they want to happen “down the road” – it’s a good idea to create documentation that can be easily shared.

Having Difficult Conversations – Later Stages

As the disease progresses, caregivers will end up having to make more and more decisions on behalf of loved ones with dementia. Some of these may have already been figured out, but plans can change based on the situation. While your loved one won’t be able to make every decision, there are still many opportunities for them to take control and make appropriate decisions.

“Although your loved one may not be able to make decisions about specific courses of treatment, he or she may be able to decide what to wear that day, or what TV show to watch,” says Andrea. “Dementia affects communication and speaking, but it’s still possible for your loved one to express their desires and wishes. You’ll just need to be patient, choose the right moment and understand how they’re trying to communicate.”

Unfortunately, there may come a time when you need to have a tough conversation and your loved one can’t – or won’t – participate. This may require you to work with a third party, like a doctor or therapist, or even make an executive decision. Things like this could be having a conversation about your loved one quitting driving, or deciding that Mom or Dad need to move to a Memory Care community.

It’s important to meet your loved ones “where they are” and understand what types of decisions they can and can’t make. For example, your loved one doesn’t want to move to a Memory Care community, but you know that it’s the right choice. Instead of trying to convince him or her why moving is necessary, you should present the situation and provide opportunities for discussion. Here are some tips for having a hard conversation:

  • Treat your loved one as the adult they are. Don’t talk down to your loved one or treat them like a child. Even if their abilities are being lost, people with dementia can still understand when they’re not being treated like adults, and that’s incredibly frustrating to them. Remember that they’re still a person who deserves respect and dignity, and be sure you always approach conversations that way.
  • Ask open-ended questions and give plenty of time for response. Instead of saying “do you want to move to Memory Care?” say instead, “How do you feel about moving to Memory Care?” Then, give your loved one as much time to respond as needed. It can be difficult to form responses, so be patient.
  • Be flexible. Your loved one may be “sharper” at certain times of the day than others. Avoid having a conversation at a “bad” time, and if you start a conversation and realize your loved one is getting anxious or frustrated, go do something else and come back to the conversation at a better time.
  • Use “I” and “we” phrases. Instead of saying things like “you should…” or “you’re going to… ,” talk about your feelings and emotions. “I feel overwhelmed and can’t give you the quality care you deserve,” is an appropriate thing to say, as is “I’m scared you’re going to seriously hurt yourself going up and down the stairs all the time.”
  • Be understanding. The world can be a confusing and scary place for those with dementia. Be kind and know that your loved one is doing the best they can – as are you. Reassure them and yourself that you want them to have fun, live their best life possible and be happy, and that everything you’re doing is to make that happen.

For more information about our community, our culture and our mission and values, please contact us at 925-272-0261.

Premier Senior Living, Dedicated Care

Offering Assisted LivingEnhanced Assisted LivingMemory CareSkilled Nursing and Rehabilitation, The Reutlinger Community provides a continuum of care that allows seniors to live a life-enhancing and stimulating environment. Located in Danville, California, The Reutlinger Community’s newly renovated, 110,000 square foot community combines the comfort and familiarity of home with seasoned senior care and skilled nursing specialists to suit any seniors needs, allowing them to live the life they choose with freedom and security.

Because we specialize in a continuum of care, our residents never need to worry about leaving the community they call home or wonder what will happen when they need some more care. Residents and families alike can have peace of mind knowing that there are full-time licensed nurses available, along with activity coordinators, social workers, caregivers, a concierge and Rabbi who focus solely on helping each resident thrive. Even better, our services and amenities are equal to those of a state-of-the-art resort. This is the lifestyle and care that your loved one deserves.

At The Reutlinger, seniors have numerous opportunities to engage in award-winning programs that are designed to engage the mind, renew the spirit and provide opportunities to meet new people and learn something new. Whether residents are enjoying our art program and museum, listening to a lecture or educational program or attending spiritual programming and our wide range of activities, there’s something for each resident to love. Participate as much or as little as you like, the choice is all yours.

For more information or to schedule a personal tour, contact us today.