Every Canvas is a Journey All It’s Own

Art With Elders has been in partnership with The Reutlinger Community and Artist Instructor Betty Rothaus for many years. This exhibit features work from eleven of her Artist Participants, as well as images and brief biographies of the artists.

Bringing Unique Visions to Life

Full time Artist-in-Residence, Betty Rothaus, MFA, (center above) offers residents individual guidance in bringing their unique vision to life. Within a beautiful fine arts studio, residents who have never created art before, as well as experienced artists, enjoy learning new skills and expressing themselves through drawing, painting in oil, acrylic, pastels or watercolor, sculpting/pottery in clay, collage, textiles, jewelry and/or mixed media.  Exhibitions each year provide a joyous sharing of our residents’ accomplishments with the entire community.  The Reutlinger Community Art Program

Betty Rothaus AWE Artist Instructor"Dwight’s Vision" canvas art Betty Rothaus
AWE Artist Instructor
https://www.bettyrothaus.com/
Remember to Remember who you are and where you are. The Master of the Good Name taught: there is a river of pure Love that flows through the universe…connecting all people, places and things. We may …“draw power from this stream of blessing at any time. All that is required is to pause and remember it’s always there.”* The problem is that we forget. We are very “busy.” Each day, thousands of thoughts and feelings anchored in the past or future prevent us from being present. They prevent us from enjoying beauty, distract us from loving ourselves, and others and from seeing and appreciating the richness and magic surrounding us. Being aware of who we are, where we are, in the present, we can fully live the precious moments of our lives. My mission is to remind us to be present – to our gifts and blessings – and to celebrate daily with joy and gratitude.

 

Marjorie Cohen

Marjorie "Layers" canvas paintingMarjorie Cohen
When Marjorie, known as Margie by her friends, first saw the work of AWE artists hanging in the halls of Reutlinger, she realized that maybe her art could be up there too. She began attending art class this spring and is happy to be succeeding now in the one subject—art–she had trouble with growing up. She enjoys doing landscapes, especially blue sky and water.

Born in Albany, New York in 1940, Margie was an only child who involved herself in the world of art and music–tap dancing, playing trumpet in an orchestra, marching band, and female dance band as well as singing in the chorus. A former middle school English teacher, she lived in various East Coast cities and her happiest memories revolve around raising her two sons. She now has three grandsons. Having lost her husband, Ira, after close to fifty years of marriage, Margie has found art to be “a nice completion, occupying my mind and my senses” in the process of grieving.

Margie has been an avid baseball fan of both minor and major league teams since the age of eight, and loves music, especially jazz. She believes in the importance of not taking yourself too seriously and describes herself as an inquisitive person. At this point, she says, “Art completes my experience.”

 

"Forest Spring" canvas artRobert DeMatheisRobert DeMatheis
“Forest Spring”  broadened my perspective of distances.

Through painting the faint mist of the background, the solidness of the cliffs in the middle ground and high contrasts of the forest in the foreground, I created the illusion of space!

After painting this, the brightness and the colors reminded me of springtime.

 

JJoan Gilloan Gill
Thanks to AWE, “Joan started becoming an artist at the age of 91,” says her son Tom. She’s living proof that it’s never too late.

Joan worked in New York, where she was born in 1926, as an interior decorator for one of the nation’s first big department stores, Lloyd and Taylor, but she devoted most of her life to care giving. She raised four children, cared for her mother and later for her husband in memory care. But she always made time to care for others too. When living in North Carolina, she delivered puzzles to people in nursing homes. As Tom points out, “She did things throughout her life that the world doesn’t celebrate.”
"Circle Round" canvas art
Joan and her husband, an IBM executive who travelled extensively, lived in Europe for a number of years and enjoyed golfing together. But her passion throughout her life was always flowers. She cared for a large rose garden, where she would sometimes appear in white heels, one of the many pairs of shoes she loved. Long-stemmed roses were her favorite, which became the subject of some of her earlier paintings.

You can find her three times a week in Reutlinger’s art room, expressing in her art what she may not be able to say in words. She likes it when “all the shapes are getting along.”

Read full article.

Artistic Expression and Its Healing Powers

By Carla Adamic, Director of Marketing, The Reutlinger Community

Learning, creativity, and self-expression are joys that can be pursued
throughout a lifetime. Although aging may place some limitations on
these pursuits, an assisted living community that provides the
opportunity and guidance for creativity can truly enrich the aging
experience.
Instructional programs in music, dance, poetry, writing, and art give
participants broadened opportunities for socialization with their fellow
residents. Communication increases, and support is shared.
Consider the benefits of a fine arts program, which taps into the innate
human need for creativity and self-expression. Making art can give the
elderly an additional “visual voice” through which to communicate,
especially if they are memory impaired. Watching something grow and
develop brings hope and focus on life. The fundamentals of art – color,
light, shape – are the words of that voice that the senior artist can use to
share the uniqueness of who they are and their abundance of
experiences.
The need for self-expression does not diminish with age. Encouraging
the elderly to share the richness of their lives through art brings insight
and joy to both the artist and to those who love them.
Residents of The Reutlinger participate in artistic expression daily
through the Discover the Artist Within program. Their amazing work
can be seen in a professionally printed calendar. For your copy call
(925) 964-2062. The Reutlinger Community is located at 4000 Camino
Tassajara in Danville.

Awakening Your Inner Spirit

Many people experience a need for connection with something greater with themselves whether it be religious in nature or simply a sense of connection with the natural world. For some of us, this can be a rewarding, lifelong journey. For others, it can be a way to change our perspective so we can see our best selves. Here are a few ways you can try to awaken your inner spirit.

Guided Meditation – For many of us, meditation can be a way to let the worries of the world pass over us and reengage with our inner selves. This doesn’t have to be religious in nature. Rather it’s simply a way to clear your mind and simply be. Consider doing this with some music or perhaps outside where you can hear the soothing sounds of nature.

Take a Nature Walk – The beauty and scope of nature is limitless. Taking a walk outside, especially in the spring can be glorious. Whether it’s a walk high in the mountains with gorgeous views and crisp air, a walk on the beach, or a simple stroll through the park where you can see the wildflowers bloom, few things are as invigorating as a simple walk outside.

Pray – Whatever your religion, prayer can have a powerful effect on a person’s spirit whether they are looking to simply appreciate life more or connect to something greater. Prayer has been proven to have a powerful positive effect on a person’s outlook and mental health. Psychologists say that prayer reduces the stress of daily life, helps a person’s sense of self-control and even makes them more pleasant to be around.

Listen to Music – Music is a language that can express the inexpressible. The emotional and spiritual effects of music can be profound. This is true of almost any type of music. Happy music can lift us up. Sad music, ironically, can do the same. A scientific study demonstrated that people trying to feel happier while listening to music by Aaron Copland actually works!

To learn more, call us at (925) 648-2800 or visit www.rcjl.org

SEVEN REUTLINGER RESIDENTS’ WORKS FEATURED AT ART WITH ELDERS EXHIBITION

 

The 24th AWE Exhibition Reception and Gala Celebration was a wonder-filled day for all 100 resident-artists, their friends, families and caregivers as well as the staff and board of AWE who create this blessed event each year. The exhibit and program took place in the historic Gerald Simon Auditorium (Bing Crosby used to broadcast his White Christmas Show there), at Laguna Honda Hospital in the San Francisco Twin Peaks area.

The residents in the show excitedly discovered their own paintings hung with a beautiful bio and black and white photograph of themselves. As viewers in the large room proceeded to move through the exhibit, the entire show was being projected on the stage visible to all the tables.

Light refreshments were brought to the tables and the celebration continued both before and after the program; each artist’s name was called by their teacher from the podium. Mark Campbell, the executive director dedicated the show to AWE’s founder, Brent Nettle.   Mark inspired us saying that beyond the beauty created and the benefits to the artists, one of the main reasons for this program to exist is for this elder generation to teach all the others generations how to age! They teach us to ignore any cultural negativity, defy the “limiting ways of being” we are taught, and live a completely, glorious life filled with creativity, beauty and achievement-our entire lives!

It is such an honor to work toward this day and then see everyone light up with inspiration, and a recognition and  celebration of the human spirit. This year our Reutlinger party included 41 people!!!!! There is much that goes on behind the scenes to make this happen. Thank you to every single person in Nursing, Vickie in the salon, Dietary, Concierge(s), Activities who contributed and special a thank you to Abdul and Ramiro who delivered us safely, Kim, Jackie, and Sue for taking care of us on the trip.

Thank you to the families of the artists for joining us and making it an especially memorable day, our friends Evelyn Ostreicher, Bob Dematteis, Sybil Marblestone, and Selma Moses, Shonny and Joe Potozkin and last but not least, our honored artists who created such stunning work:

Michie Takashima, Loraine Hornbeck, Maher Salama, Fran Dobin, Rita R. Goldman, Katarina, Kivel, and Rhoda Wasserman.

Betty Rothaus, Artist-In-Residence
bobev bob_loraine fran-_maherjpg fran_deb fran_jackie katarina_fam loraine maher-therese_bet maher_fam rhoda_susan rita-gerry-sue selma_kim shon_bet shonny_joe takashima-fam abdulramiro-evelyn

The Healing Power of Beauty Through Artistic Expression in the Elderly

Carla Adamic Outside

 

 

 

 

 

By Carla Adamic, The Reultinger Community

Learning, creativity, and self-expression are joys that can be pursued throughout a lifetime. Although aging may place some limitations on these pursuits, an assisted living community that provides the opportunity and guidance for creativity can truly enrich the aging experience.

 

Instructional programs in music, dance, poetry, writing, and art give participants broadened opportunities for socialization with their fellow residents. Communication increases, and support is shared.

JoanBrown

Consider the benefits of a fine arts program, which taps into the innate human need for creativity and self-expression. Making art can give the elderly an additional “visual voice” through which to communicate, especially if they are memory impaired. Watching something grow and develop brings hope and focus on life.  The fundamentals of art – color, light, shape – are the words of that voice that the senior artist can use to share the uniqueness of who they are and their abundance of experiences.

 

The need for self-expression does not diminish with age. Encouraging the elderly to share the richness of their lives through art brings insight and joy to both the artist and to those who love them.

 

We welcome your questions. Call (925)648-2800 or visit www.rcjl.org.

Seven Reutlinger Residents Selected to Compete in 23rd Annual Art With Elders in San Francisco

 

Joan Brown is among the seven Reutlinger Community residents chosen for the Art With Elders juried exhibition in San Francisco later this month. (Photo courtesy Reutlinger Community).